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amazing vegetables! yu choi sum will rock your ramen!

Yu Choi or yo choy


Yo choy sum, or Yu Choi sum is one of my staple vegetables, similar to Gailaan (Chinese broccoli) but, it’s a tad sweeter + with a light mustardy flavor.

available at almost all Asian markets, it belongs to the brassica family, and is related to other Choi type vegetables. It’s characteristics closely resemble gailaan. A stalk around 6″ a few leaves, and a tiny brassica floret. Yu Choi is usually harvested once one or two flowers pop. So you may see a few little flowers!

Most of the the vegetables that hail from Asia, are the products of centuries of remarkable breeding. Taking up much less space in a garden plot, they typically mature at a much faster rate, giving the farmer opportunity for higher turnover. Thus, producing more tender and often sweeter varieties than Thier distant brassica relatives in Europe. The produce sections of Asian Groceries are usually swimming in all kind of lesser known, but totally valuable veggies. Yu Choi is one of the most popular. And with good reason.

flavor is one, with it’s slightly sweet and lightly mustard undertones. Slide it right into a soup, add a handful to a stir-fry, tasty side dish or prepare it with garlic and serve with noodles.

Being a mustard family member, a good starting recommendation for how to season Yu Choi would be all the alliums you can throw at it. The flavors of garlic and mustards are always a mutually supportive pairing. Other things to consider would be toasted sesame oil, toasted sesame seeds, Korean red pepper flakes, rice vinegar, shoyu sauce and garlic chives. Ałl available at Asian grocery stores. Be aware that Yu Choi cooks fast. Only a minute or two of steaming or boiling, and three minutes in a pan. A little more time than that won’t ruin it, but experiment and be cautious! I’ll be adding recipes soon, in the meantime, if these things sound good and give you some ideas, experiment away!

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amazing vegetables! Vegan chicken base

better than bouillon – no chicken base

If you’re a vegan or vegetarian and you’ve never put a spoonful of this secret flavor weapon into a sauce or soup, drop what your doing. Go out, get a jar + immediately add some to your next savory recipe.

if this is your first experience, make an initial sipping broth just to see the potential contained within this powerful jar. Imagine adding it to rice. Saffron rice, Spanish rice, paellas, stir fry rice. Don’t stop there, send it in to back up a curry, a gravy, almost any soup. This stuff is truly amazing and adding it to the simplest of recipes will reap rewards and accolades. Even a tiny bit. Almost anything that contains water at any point during a cooking process. Experiment, and others will tell you how much your skills have improved. Trust me on this!

Better than bouillon vegan no chicken base
So freaking good
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vegan soy pâté

soy based spread from Romania!

I’m mainly writing about this because unless you’re from the land of Vlad the impaler, you might not know this exists. I didn’t until recently perusing the aisles of lee Lee international market in Phoenix, az. It’s available at both Lee Lee locations in Phoenix, but i was unable to find it in a couple Eastern European groceries in Portland, Oregon this summer. Various websites list it, but at least half were out of stock. So, unless you live near PHX, it may be a little effort to obtain. here’s one link that had it in stock at time of writing.

However, if your a fan of snacks and sandwiches, it’s worth wrangling up some. Having tried animal based pâté in the past only a few times, i can say it’s a pretty decent stand in. Here’s an example: in new Orleans, it’s standard to get pâté on a Vietnamese bahn-mi. If this soy based pâté was used instead, i would never know the difference. That said, it would be a amazing addition to a vegan bahn-mi that would add a background flavor and texture difficult to reproduce any other way. Really, this would make a vegan bahn-mi come together in a way that actually would be appropriately called one. Otherwise, it’s just an attempt; a vegan sandwich that tries to remind you of a bahn-mi at best. The other mistake would be bread selection, and hopefully you have access to a Vietnamese bakery. But, if all you can get are hoagie rolls in your area, don’t. Just make a different type of sandwich at that point. But i digress, this isn’t supposed to be a bahn mi article. however, here is my vegan bahn mi recipe anyway.

other types of sandwiches are good too, and this soy pâté can be there to help. So far I’ve used it on toasted bread with avacado and tomato, a typical type sandwich with field roast or Yves deli slices and Chao creamy original vegan cheese slices and as a snack on crackers with Roma tomatoes. İt’s been a welcome addition every time, and brings protein and extra tastiness into the situation.

if you do not live an an area where this is available, try an internet search for ‘scandia Sibiu soy pâté’ there are varieties with mushroom, paprika and plain. They’re all good, but the mushroom is my favorite followed by paprika. Prices seem to range on the internet and it’s out of stock on a few sites, so look around, you shouldn’t have to pay more than 1.99 a 4.2 oz / 120g can.

no animal ingredients are listed, but doesn’t particularly say vegan on the can. There is msg (I’m a fan) and gluten, if these are concerns.

Vitalia and scandia Sibiu brand soy pate’
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Amazing vegetables! -gailaan

gai lan or Chinese broccoli

Gailaan, gai lan, or Chinese broccoli; a versatile vegetable ingredient, both tasty + healthy. It is a relative of the tougher skinned and slower growing Italian type broccoli. It has a delicious flavor, cooks fast, and is a breeze to prep. Gailaan is universally found in the produce sections of Asian markets. Usually saddled alongside Yu Choi Sum and other great asian vegetable varieties.

click here to read more about amazing gailaan!…